ATI teams with MicaSense for precision agriculture expansion

- http://www.uasmagazine.com/articles/795/ati-teams-with-micasense-for-precision-agriculture-expansion

Aerial Technology International (ATI) is expanding its unnamed aerial system technology business into the precision agriculture industry to help farmers make more cost-effective decisions.

Located in Clackamas, Oregon, ATI provides data through video, thermal imaging, multi-spectral imaging and tailored software applications integrated into its UAS technology. The company is teaming with MicaSense, a firm specializing in multi-spectral camera solutions, data processing and analytics.

“A large percentage of the domestic drone sales will be in the agriculture industry,” ATI co-founder Stephen Burtt said of the company’s decision to expand. “We happen to have a team and a network of people that brought all the pieces necessary to actually do this. The partnership with MicaSense was the final keystone that made it all work.”

Read more at UAS Magazine…

How an Oregon drone maker wants to make life easier for farmers

- http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/blog/2014/09/how-an-oregon-drone-maker-wants-to-make-life.html

Clackamas-based Aerial Technology Inc. is taking its unmanned aerial system know-how to the fields. The company has teamed with MicaSense, a Simi Valley, California-based imaging and data processing firm, to create a system specific for the emerging business of precision agriculture. 

For agricultural customers ATI is outfitting its aerial unmanned vehicles with MicaSense’s multi-spectral cameras. The UAVs fly over a field or vineyard and gather information through the cameras. That data is then crunched by MicaSense and can help growers glean information about crop health.

Read more at Portland Business Journal…

Aerial Technology Expands UAS Offerings into Ag Industry

- http://www.precisionfarmingdealer.com/content/aerial-technology-expands-uas-offerings-ag-industry

CLACKAMAS, Ore., September 19, 2014 — Aerial Technology (ATI) has announced they are expanding their UAS technology into the ag industry. The goal of the move is provide useful data that will enable farmers and produce growers the ability to make cost-effective decisions.

ATI provides data through video, thermal imaging, multi-spectral imaging and tailored software applications, integrated into their UAS technology.

Aerial Technology has teamed up with MicaSense, a firm that provides multi-spectral camera solutions and data processing and analytics. Using multi-spectral cameras, this highly sensitive application will capture videos and photos of crops remotely, sense different colors of light, provide data processing, sensitive mapping strategies and analytics of data gathered to determine crop vigor.

 

Read more at Precision Farming Dealer…

Furman’s drone wins top prize in national competition

- http://newspress.furman.edu/2014/08/furmans-drone-wins-top-prize/

A Furman University team led by physics professor John Conrad won first place in the Drone Prize 2014 competition which was held Aug. 22-24 in Oregon. Carried out by three finalists, the competition consisted of five-parts—an oral presentation and four rigorous piloting exercises. Furman was awarded first place in a ceremony at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry in Portland. The prize, valued at more than $8,000, was a fully-outfitted DJI heavy lifter S-800 hexacopter system donated by Aerial Technology International. 

 

Read more at Furman University…

Oregon Wine Press UAS Precision Ag with ATI

- http://www.aerialtechnology.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/ATI_OregonWinePressAugust2014_OPT.pdf

Companies like HoneyComb Corp in Wilsonville and Aerial Technology international in Clackamas manufacture and perform custom system integration for agricultural drones, respectively, that fly over vineyards — and other farming operations — to gather multispectral imaging from sensors made by companies like Micasense. The California outfit also processes the data-driven images, which can give viticulturists an anal- ysis of plant health using vegetative indices such as nDVi (normalized Difference Vegetation index). The use of UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) has made the spectral imaging eas- ier to afford, easier to obtain and at a much higher resolution: a couple inches per pixel. Up until now this resolution has not been available.

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